JMS

Bio

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Short Bio:
J. Mark Scearce is one of North Carolina's most recognized and performed composers. Recipient of the 2010 Raleigh Medal of Arts and the 2009 International Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in Music Composition, Scearce has sixty active titles in his catalogue, including musical settings of more than two hundred texts by forty poets. Scearce’s many works for orchestra, band, chorus, opera, chamber, and ballet have been performed throughout North America, Europe, Asia, and the Pacific. The recipient of five advanced degrees in music, philosophy and religion, including the doctorate in composition from Indiana University, Scearce has won six international music competitions and his music is available on seven commercial recordings. Having taught on the music faculties of the Universities of Hawaii, North Texas, and Southern Maine, he is formerly Director of the Music Department at North Carolina State University and a tenured professor in the College of Design.

Long Bio:
Born in Edina, Missouri in 1960, J. Mark Scearce has five degrees in music composition, theory, french horn performance, and philosophy and religion, including the doctorate in composition from Indiana University. His teachers have included John Eaton, Harvey Sollberger, and Donald Erb. With sixty active titles in his catalogue, including musical settings of more than two hundred texts by forty poets, Scearce’s many works for orchestra, band, chorus, opera, chamber, and ballet have been performed throughout North America, Europe, Asia, and the Pacific.

His compositions have been awarded numerous honors, among them from the Wellesley Composers' Conference (1987), the June in Buffalo Festival (1989), the Atlantic Center for the Arts (1995), the SCI National Conference (1993), Yaddo (1998), Ucross (2008), The MacDowell Colony (2000) and the American Music Center (1996, 1998). His works have been awarded First Prize in four national competitions: the 1982 Chicago Brass Quintet Competition, the 1988 NACUSA Young Composers' Competition, and the 1991 Christensen Prize and 1999 Mu Upsilon Sigma Prize both from Franklin and Marshall College.

In 1993 Dr. Scearce was one of three national winners of the First Triennial Opera Composition Competition sponsored by the Moore Foundation of Texas. In 1997 he was a recipient of Hawaii's first-ever Individual Artist Award for Music Composition awarded by the State Foundation on Culture and the Arts. In 1999 Dr. Scearce was awarded the North Carolina Arts Council Biennial Music Composition Fellowship, and in 2009 the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Prize in Music Composition from the University of Connectiut.

Scearce currently has six works commercially available on compact disc: the Delos recording of the Chicago Brass Quintet ["Virtuoso Brass"], the Warner Bros. recording of Orchestra Nashville [“Conversations in Silence”], the Capstone recording of the Mallarme Chamber Players [“It Won’t Be the Same River”], the Centaur recording of his Magritte Variations [“Middle Voices”], the Equilibrium recording of his King of Tonga [“Shared Visions”], the Albany recording of pianist John Cheek's performance of his 99 Beautiful Names of God, and his String Quartet 1° (Y2K) recorded by the Fry Street Quartet on a Sony 4-channel SACD.

Dr. Scearce has served as an arts administrator with the Bowling Green (OH) New Music and Art Festival, the Raleigh (NC) Symphony Development Association, and the Indiana University New Music Ensemble. He was Composer-in-Residence at North Carolina State University for two years, and served for four years on the faculty of the University of Hawaii, where he was founder and director of a contemporary music ensemble and new music festival.

Following three years as Composer-in-Residence back in North Carolina as part of the national Meet The Composer New Residencies program, Dr. Scearce taught for a year on the visiting music composition faculty of the University of North Texas before accepting appointment as Resident Composer in the School of Music at the University of Southern Maine. He is formerly Director of the Music Department at North Carolina State University and a tenured professor in the College of Design.

 

 

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